News

What to Look for in a Refrigerated Truck

Companies use refrigerated trucks to transport foods and drinks, pharmaceuticals, floral arrangements, and any other product that needs to stay a certain temperature when being moved. To do this, companies need a vehicle with a consistently refrigerated body. If you want to purchase a vehicle for these purposes, here is what to look for in a refrigerated truck before you buy one.

Temperature

The hallmark feature of a refrigerated truck is its cooling capacity. If you’re transporting flowers, you likely don’t want them frozen during shipment. On the other hand, you cannot undercool foods such as milk or vegetables—this can spoil the product. Make sure your truck meets your unique needs for refrigeration and insulation.

Fuel efficiency

Refrigerated trucks guzzle a lot of gas. The cooling mechanism taxes the truck’s fuel economy, so refrigerated trucks have lower efficiency than typical box trucks. It’s particularly important to choose a truck that has features to address this issue—every mile per gallon higher means you save money on gas. One fuel-saving method is upping the insulation in the truck to avoid losing cold air. Another way to improve efficiency is to keep the truck’s overall weight low by using lightweight parts. Emerald Transportation Solutions has many lightweight refrigerated trucks for sale meant to conserve gas and keep you on the road longer than other trucks.

Right Size

Body size is another aspect to look for in a refrigerated truck. Depending on the size of your product or current operation scale, the truck’s size will vary. Consider buying a smaller truck to save money on purchase and gas costs or invest in a larger truck if you see your shipping needs growing soon.

Condition

If you’re buying a new refrigerated truck, there isn’t much to check when it comes to condition, but when going the used route, its condition is important. Make sure the used trucks you look at have the cooling equipment you want, and that the previous owner maintained it appropriately. Mind the truck’s overall drivability, too—a truck’s no good if its cooling features function but it can’t take your product where it needs to go.